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<  Yi Jianlian and other Asian NBA players  ~  The Starbury Phenomenum in CBA

pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:54 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China

Stephon Marbury is fastly becoming a phenomenum in China and become the most popular expat basketball players in CBA.


This is his 3rd season in CBA.

He had gelled into his new team Beijing Capital Steel Ducks, and fastly earned the respect of his head coach and young team mates, the recognition and love of the fans, and become the leader and star of the team.

And under his leadership by example, the Beijing Capital Steel Ducks is currently undefeated, with a 9 ~ 0 winning streak to the new season, breaking a 17-year franchise record for the Beijing team.


I will continue to update Stephon Marbury's life in CBA here with this dedicated thread.
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Malorkayel
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:58 am Reply with quote
Joined: 14 Nov 2003 Posts: 11665
Winning fixes all.
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:07 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China
A pretty comprehensive summary on New York Times a week ago on WHAT happened to the bad boy and lone wolf of NBA in the past 3 years.

Quote:


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/05/sports/basketball/stephon-marbury-finding-success-and-serenity-in-china.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2

Away From N.B.A., Finding
Success and Serenity in China


By WILLIAM C. RHODEN
Published: December 4, 2011


Stephon Marbury sounded content and tranquil last week as he described his new life in China. Perhaps it was because he was tired; after all, it was nearly midnight in Beijing.

Or maybe Marbury was simply content.

“I have no complaints,” he said. “I’m blessed; life is good.”

On the court, Marbury is the catalyst for the undefeated Beijing Ducks of the Chinese Basketball Association, who are off to their best start in 16 years.
They won their sixth game Friday, defeating Kenyon Martin’s Xinjiang team, 99-97. On Sunday, they defeated Shanxi, 121-92, with Marbury scoring 19 points. He is averaging 22.3 points, 5.7 assists and 1.9 steals a game for the Ducks, who signed him in August.

Marbury, 34, is flourishing off the court as well. He said acclimating to a new culture was the best thing about this part of his odyssey, which has taken him from Lincoln High School on Coney Island to Georgia Tech to the N.B.A. After an often-tumultuous 13-year N.B.A. career, Marbury said that in China, he had found a home, a revitalized career. He maintains residences in Los Angeles and New York, but China, he said, is his soul’s new resting place.

“It’s just something about the serenity and peace of the country,” he said. “I can’t really explain it; you’ve got to experience it.”

Marbury is in a great space: his own driver, an apartment in Beijing in the equivalent of the Wall Street district and a team that could help him win his first pro basketball championship.

“I never thought in my life that I’d end up going to China and wanting to spend the rest of my life here,” he said.

Marbury also writes a weekly newspaper column in China Daily. Given his often contentious relations with the news media in the United States, this gig is one of the greatest punch lines of the new chapter of his life.

“It’s beautiful when you can tell your own story,” he said.

Other former N.B.A. players are playing in China. During the recently ended lockout, four-high profile players signed with Chinese Basketball Association teams: Martin with Xinjiang, Wilson Chandler with Zhejiang Guangsha, J. R. Smith with Zhejiang Chouzhou and Aaron Brooks with four-time defending champion Guangdong.

Unlike players who signed with European teams, the players in China are contractually obligated to play the entire Chinese season, which ends in March.

What may come as the biggest surprise to those who remember Marbury’s N.B.A. days is that he has become a bridge over troubled waters for Chandler, Smith and Brooks. He helped Brooks, formerly of the Houston Rockets, and Chandler, formerly of the Knicks and the Denver Nuggets, adjust to the food and nuances of China. Marbury talks with Chandler every other day.

Marbury even recently counseled Smith, a former Nugget, after he had clashes with his team, which threatened to void his contract. The team suspected Smith was purposely missing practices and games once he realized he would be held to his contract.

“I spoke with J. R. and I told him to make himself completely vulnerable to love: embrace the culture,” Marbury said. “You’ve got to acclimate yourself to something different, you’ve got to grow into it — and then you get this stillness and calmness about yourself.”


That sounds good, though the reality is that Marbury, Smith, Brooks and Chandler are at different points in their careers. Chandler, Brooks and Smith are looking for big paychecks and the glamour that comes with being an N.B.A. player. Marbury, who has had all of that, was looking for a sanctuary.

His last three seasons in the N.B.A. were a nightmare, even as he fulfilled a boyhood dream of playing for the Knicks. He feuded with two Knicks coaches, Larry Brown and Mike D’Antoni, and had a falling out with his mentor Isiah Thomas.

As part of a sexual harassment suit against Madison Square Garden, Marbury had to testify under oath that he had sex with an intern. There was also a bizarre video he made in July 2009 in which he appeared to weep intensely and at one point ate Vaseline. Clearly, Marbury needed a change.

Marbury said the crying occurred because he was thinking about his father, Don, who died Dec. 2, 2007, during a Knicks-Suns game. “If you know anything about us, you know that my father was the leader at the helm of all of the Marburys,” he said. “He was the man, period.”

In early 2009, the Knicks bought out Marbury’s contract, under which he was due $20.8 million for that season, and he signed with the Boston Celtics. Boston offered a one-year deal for the 2009-10 season, but Marbury was wise enough to say enough. He needed a break — from the N.B.A., from New York, from the United States.

In January 2010, Marbury signed with the Shanxi Zhongyu Brave Dragons of the Chinese league. He left the Brave Dragons last December to join Foshan.

Bill Duffy, a longtime sports agent with deep roots in China, has followed Marbury since his high school days. He also represented Yao Ming when he entered the N.B.A.

“The guy was losing his mind before he left,” Duffy said of Marbury. “Relatives all over him, living in a fish bowl in New York City, this issue, that issue; sitting on the bench with the Knicks, they won’t let you play, then being banned from the facility. He just needed to get someplace where people don’t know him and he can just be a regular person but still have that allure as a basketball player. Just in a condensed form.”


During the course of a conversation with Marbury, it was suggested that his was a temporary move. “It ain’t temporary, it’s for good,” Marbury corrected. “I’m going to stay here, I’m going to live here. I love it here.

“I didn’t come here because basketball was out; I came here to rebuild myself, retire myself. I lost my father — I was dealing with a lot. People couldn’t really understand that; I’m like you think I’m crazy, but I’m so far from crazy.”


The lives of young professional athletes are a succession of chapters. For Marbury, there was the New York City playground and high school legend; the college star; and the N.B.A. player who did well but never lived up to manufactured expectations.

The final chapter of Marbury’s basketball life is unfolding in China, a place he unwaveringly calls home. “The country gave me everything I needed to get my spirits back to where I needed them to be, they gave me an opportunity to play basketball again and they gave me an opportunity to build a brand here,” he said.

China is like a forgotten road, though that is likely to change before long. Yao Ming owns a team and plans to open a basketball academy in Shanghai. Marbury plans to conduct clinics and basketball workshops and would like to coach the Chinese national team.

He also plans to restart his Starbury sneaker and sports apparel line this month. His playing career in the N.B.A. and his war with the N.B.A. are over.

“I don’t have a desire to come back to the N.B.A.,” Marbury said. “I’m done; I’m running for something; I’m not running for them no more.”
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temuchin
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:10 am Reply with quote
Joined: 01 Apr 2004 Posts: 10073
you're not going to find many Starbury fans here, even on YMM.

the guy was an asshole.
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:12 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China


A MORE recent one on Wall Street Journal (dated December 10, 2011) on his days in China.


Quote:


http://cn.wsj.com/gb/20111210/rcu094340_ENversion.shtml

At Home, in Beijing,
With Stephon Marbury


Stephon Marbury, also known now as Ma Bu Li, is making himself at home in China.

Now in his third season with the Chinese Basketball Association, the former NBA star has led the undefeated Beijing Jinyu Ducks to seven victories so far, and plans to begin selling his low-cost Starbury shoes on TV. Like many expatriates in China, the experience has highlighted some cultural differences for Mr. Marbury between the U.S. where he started his career, and China, where he hopes to retire and to one day coach the national basketball team.

'The attitude toward how they do business is totally different,' but that doesn't translate to a whole lot of difference for business owners,' Mr. Marbury said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. 'Some people speak about it being a Communist country, and I'm like well, in America [there's] democracy, but there are just rules before they tell you you can't do something. Here in China they just tell you right away, 'No you can't do that.''

When returning home, the cultural differences are evident too, including in arguments with friends over the differences between Chinese food from China and the Chinese food available in the U.S., he says. 'You think that's Chinese from the corner store, but that's not Chinese food,' he said. 'I'm telling you because I live there.'

As for Chinese basketball, Mr. Marbury is hoping he and other NBA players will help influence Chinese players and help China produce more stars like Yao Ming. 'There are some guys that have potential,' he said. Chinese players should learn 'the mentality of being like a dog on the court, just hard, aggressive … just a beast, a guy who's just nasty, that's what needs to be instilled into the Chinese players.'

'As more people come to this country and continue to implement the things that they learned,' Chinese players will be able to 'go to the States get on the basketball court,' he said.

Loretta Chao
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:15 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China
There is an accompanied video in the WSJ interview where Stephon Marbury takes some time out between folding laundry at his home in Beijing to talk about his experience in the country.

http://allthingsd.com/video/?video_id=5BA8E088-32EC-4455-B859-34452D22B8F8
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:55 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China

A video of Stephon Marbury spending alot of his time during team practice to teach offensive and defensive moves to young players such as Zhai Xiaochuan, Wang Xiaohui, Ji Zhe and Zhu Yanxi of his Beijing team.


http://v.ku6.com/show/spigKUfkUjdH0lb4.html
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:30 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China
temuchin wrote:
you're not going to find many Starbury fans here, even on YMM.

the guy was an asshole.


He could be an @$$hole while he was in NBA.

But as I've said, he could be TOTALLY mis-represented by US media and he was wronged and misunderstood.

Personally found his desire to start over a new leaf, and his effort of gelling into the life of China to become a common Beijinger MOVING AND AMAZING.

Happy that he now found serenity and inner peace and a new found life in China.

Some photos of Stephon Marbury enjoying life in China.

Catching the most busiest MTR in Beijing for his team practice every morning






Going to watch his favorite Beijing GuoAn soccer team play with his beloved ones










Enjoy the tranquillity at his apartment with Chinese tea




Guest appearance in a Beijing Xiang Sheng aka Cross Talk show


Enjoy the passion of winning on the court
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temuchin
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 7:29 am Reply with quote
Joined: 01 Apr 2004 Posts: 10073
pryuen wrote:

But as I've said, he could be TOTALLY mis-represented by US media and he was wronged and misunderstood.


I'm not hating on the guy. But he was a schoolboy legend in New York and I've been hearing about this guy for about 15 years.

When things are fine he'll behave. Even this act in China seems like a big ****** you to the NBA and America.

If he starts to lose or has a fight with his shoe distributor or doesn't like something the Chinese write or say about him don't be surprised when he starts blaming everyone else, calls management racist, rages at the media and generally goes apeshit.

Right now he's feeding off the adulation of the Chinese, something he hasn't had for years in the US and something he can't have in the US any longer... since he supposedly can't even dunk. I hope he has great success in the CBA and even elevates the play of his teammates. I'm just dubious. I'm simply waiting for the other shoe to drop. At some point his naivety about China is going to dissipate and then he'll be raging. If you had problems with Tmac not playing hard or acting like a prima donna, Tmac is like Yao compared to Starbury.
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pryuen
Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 7:41 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Feb 2003 Posts: 48947 Location: Hong Kong/China

Stephon Marbury and his 2 favorite young players of Beijing Capital Steel Ducks: the 20-year-old Zhu Yanxi on the left, and the 18-year-old Zhai Xiaochuan on the right. Both Zhu and Zhai are rookies playing in their first CBA season.

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