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<  Yao on the court, and his most recent game  ~  Sports Illustrated Article on Yao.....

PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2005 9:40 pm
User avatarPosts: 2540Location: HKSARJoined: Thu May 29, 2003 1:07 am
Quote:
But Yao has also rented an apartment in downtown Houston for game days and nights, enabling him to avoid the nightmarish Texas traffic -- and his mother's cloying affection.


Smart move, Yao!
And thanks for the read, FFz!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2005 10:45 pm
Posts: 302Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2004 9:34 pm
There's been quite a bit of discussion on the c1utch board about the accuracy of this article, particularly regarding the insinuation that Yao's parents' marriage was arranged by the Chinese government in order to breed a super-athlete.

Any thoughts on whether this could be true or the writer is just misrepresenting or misunderstanding the facts.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2005 7:30 am
Posts: 2322Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 12:52 pm
Yeah, Ming Pao, which is quite neutral, reported that this article / book is quite biased. I don't know how true that is either. And I am not sure whether the CCP was powerful to pre-arranged so many things. In fact, the real doubt is whether the CCP is so smart to have such a good vision many years ago.
:D

m_cable wrote:
There's been quite a bit of discussion on the c1utch board about the accuracy of this article, particularly regarding the insinuation that Yao's parents' marriage was arranged by the Chinese government in order to breed a super-athlete.

Any thoughts on whether this could be true or the writer is just misrepresenting or misunderstanding the facts.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2005 9:36 am
Posts: 982Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2003 2:47 pm
m_cable wrote:
There's been quite a bit of discussion on the c1utch board about the accuracy of this article, particularly regarding the insinuation that Yao's parents' marriage was arranged by the Chinese government in order to breed a super-athlete.

Any thoughts on whether this could be true or the writer is just misrepresenting or misunderstanding the facts.


I don't know how true Yao's parents' arranged marriage is but I'm not surprised if it's true. Chinese likes to do matchmaking for friends and relatives. It's natural for people trying to match 2 tallest players in Shanghai into marriage. For women playing center (e.g. 190cm), who else can you marry to match your height? The best option would be the male center of the same city team if she finds him attractive enough.

I've noticed that a few prominent players from China have parents who play basketball too. For example, Wang ZZ, Mo Ke. Do you know of others? Maybe it's easier to find someone in the same field or maybe it's systematic matchmaking from authority?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 982Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2003 2:47 pm
Judge wrote:
Yeah, Ming Pao, which is quite neutral, reported that this article / book is quite biased. I don't know how true that is either. And I am not sure whether the CCP was powerful to pre-arranged so many things. In fact, the real doubt is whether the CCP is so smart to have such a good vision many years ago.
:D


I agree. The article makes it look like it was an experiment or a project that being planned and executed for a long time. If it's true there should be some other Yao Mings somewhere in China now.

I do believe with Yao's success young players today are more likely to seek companionship from the opposite sex of the basketball field.

A conversation between a 7' male and 6'3" female basketball players could be like the following:

"Look at Yao's achievement. If we get married, we may bring out another Yao 20 years from now."

"OK. Let's get married."


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2005 6:31 pm
User avatarPosts: 4321Location: Harvard MedJoined: Tue Sep 23, 2003 2:48 pm
Boy, that was one ridunkulously long article. And this is mid-terms week for me. It's good to know that Yao is a pretty normal dude, who gets a tad bit annoyed with his mother's over-affection. Though I have to say, it's difficult to determine what the main point and agenda of the article was; personally, it seemed more like an expose' on the PRC.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:00 pm
Posts: 10073Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2004 7:10 pm
waterfall_zen wrote:
Judge wrote:
Yeah, Ming Pao, which is quite neutral, reported that this article / book is quite biased. I don't know how true that is either. And I am not sure whether the CCP was powerful to pre-arranged so many things. In fact, the real doubt is whether the CCP is so smart to have such a good vision many years ago.
:D


I agree. The article makes it look like it was an experiment or a project that being planned and executed for a long time. If it's true there should be some other Yao Mings somewhere in China now.

I do believe with Yao's success young players today are more likely to seek companionship from the opposite sex of the basketball field.

A conversation between a 7' male and 6'3" female basketball players could be like the following:

"Look at Yao's achievement. If we get married, we may bring out another Yao 20 years from now."

"OK. Let's get married."


westerners tend to romanticize or instutionalize Chinese, as opposed to just recognizing they're just people. I'm certain officials encouraged or just assumed Ma Feng and other players would marry other players but it's not as if she was forced or coerced or even ORDERED to do so. not everything is a consipracy or grand plan for world domination just because those sneaky asians are involved

after all, you're a 6'2" woman in china with no education and very little practical skills except kicking ***** on the basketball court. how many guys in that nation of 1 billion is going to be able to see eye-to-eye with you. it makes sense that she'd feel comfortable marrying someone with whom she had sports in common.

and it's worked out for her. marriage is a crapshoot down the road, even if you marry someone you're crazy about on day 1. supposedly she hasn't had an easy life but her marriage is strong. she has a nice son and from all appearances she and her husband has had 25+ years of a harmonious relationship. how many non-basketball couples can say that? if that's a forced marriage then kudos to her for having a kickass forced marriage


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 2:44 pm
User avatarPosts: 10633Location: PhillyJoined: Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:03 am
Yao's mother put education first instead of basketball shows how caring she is.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 6:12 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
Judge wrote:
Yeah, Ming Pao, which is quite neutral, reported that this article / book is quite biased. I don't know how true that is either. And I am not sure whether the CCP was powerful to pre-arranged so many things. In fact, the real doubt is whether the CCP is so smart to have such a good vision many years ago.
:D


Well all I could say about that article or that book is that it's FULL OF CRAP !!!

If China had planned it for 3 generations, WHY did they not genetic-engineering more other "Yao Mings", say at least 3 ~ 4 and train them in different positions that Chinese basketball can be #1 in the world ?? Or they can produce more "Liu Xiangs" or "Maradonas" that they can dominate tracks and field and soccer and other sports as well. WHY just one Yao Ming ??

As to the pre-arranged marriage ?? I don't buy it neither.
People should understand, these basketballers or I should say athletes of any kind in China were sent away from home into sports academies to get education and professional training, and either promoted or thrown out of the academies depending on their capabilities and performance. Most of them had very small social circle and seldom had chances to meet friends of opposite genders when they grow into adolescence except the ones around them in the academy or in the national team. It happened in diving, gymnastics, volleyball, badminton, table tennis and basketball that men and women admired, befriended and fell in love with each other and got married when they retired from the sports. That is not pre-arranged marriage.

I also did not buy the story of Fang Fengdi being the leader of the Red Guards at the age of 17, and took lead in prosecuting Zhu Yong. If people bother to do a Google search on Zhu Yong, the guy later rose again and redeemed his reputation in the 70s after the Cultural Revolution, and became top official in the Shanghai Municipal Sports Commissions. If Fang Fengdi really treated him that bad during the Cultural Revolution, do you guys think she would only be relegated to manual work after she retired from the national team, or Yao Ming would be able to emerge from obscurity and promoted thru the ranks thru the sports academy?? Zhu Yong would in all his powers tried to stop Yao Ming's rise to prominence.

To me, this is but just another form of China Threat conspiracy theory from Brook Larmer in order to boost readership and sales for his book.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 8:29 pm
Posts: 10073Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2004 7:10 pm
I dont think there's any doubt that she was a Red Guard. And the fact that neither she nor her husband were able to secure coaching jobs after their careers could very well indicate that someone high in the organization like Zhu Yong could have blackballed them. after all both were well known and well liked athletes. it's unusual that their talents would be wasted for manual labor.

I liked Larmer's articles on Yi and Yao in the past. The article doesn't elaborate on how Yao was "created" by the Commies however. it certainly doesn't support the "3 generations in the making" eugenics thing about Yao Ming... to be completely fair, the idea of how the sports machine created basketball stars might be better proven in later chapters in his book, this article is just a small setup not even really about Yao. I believe the rest of his book talks about how they actually developed Yao Ming and WZZ and marketed them to the world.

pry, I agree with you that as presented in the article, Yao's parents were far from created by the government. it's not even pre-arranged marriage. it simply sounds like one of their elders did some matchmaking. honestly, who else is a 6'2" woman in china gonna marry other than another athlete?


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