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<  Yao on the court, and his most recent game  ~  Rockets v Magic 23 October 7pm

PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 11:03 pm
Posts: 465Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2003 2:00 pm
bblock12000 wrote:
neither are you.

but , unlike you, i know that 2 is not 3


you talk like you are NBA expert when your are the garbage....... so please cut your crap


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 11:25 pm
Posts: 357Location: bay areaJoined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 2:39 pm
neodurdin wrote:
True, you are either born aggressive or not, but culture plays a major part. I wouldn't listen to everything that the Chuckmeister says. He doesn't even know the friggin difference between "your" and "you're". Sad is the fact that Kenny Smith had to point out the difference to the Chuckmeister by saying, "this is YOUR shirt" and "YOU'RE an idiot". After that, chuckmeister STILL didn't get the difference. Sad will be the day America learns their wisdom from idiots like Chuck. He might have a basketball mind, but that's about it. Frankly...whether you are born aggressive or not, does not affect how you play. It's all about effort. Dunking is effort, boxing out is effort, bodying people is effort. I don't see how any of these things have to do with how you are born and what your culture did to you, it's just an excuse.


i think aggression does play a role in your basketball IQ. it plays a role of questioning yourself of: should i pass, shoot, set a screen, pump fake, etc. seriously, yao seems a little confused and hesitant of what to do to help the player get open, or make a guarentee shot himself. tim duncan on the other hand is quite aggressive/intelligent by nature. with his aggression/intelligence basketball wise build his skills, and got him to become what is considered the best basketball player in the planet.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 7:19 am
User avatarPosts: 644Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 9:46 pm
I agree, being aggressive actually makes you a better player. Or the same could be said, being passionate about the game because there are a lot of things about playing basketball that is not talent related, but effort related like chasing after loose balls, banging bodies, boxing out, defense, rebounding etc. I know this from my own experience. I've used to be the most passionate and competitive guy on the court and it made me the leader of the team. Leaders are naturally demanding of themselves and their teammates and are not afraid to call people out. In this respect, I don't see any of that in Yao, I blame the culture. I know the culture, I am from the same culture. If Yao grew up in the States, this would be a totally different Yao, he would be dominating by now as opposed to playing passive aggressively.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 8:20 am
User avatarPosts: 93Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 9:00 am
neodurdin wrote:
I agree, being aggressive actually makes you a better player. Or the same could be said, being passionate about the game because there are a lot of things about playing basketball that is not talent related, but effort related like chasing after loose balls, banging bodies, boxing out, defense, rebounding etc. I know this from my own experience. I've used to be the most passionate and competitive guy on the court and it made me the leader of the team. Leaders are naturally demanding of themselves and their teammates and are not afraid to call people out. In this respect, I don't see any of that in Yao, I blame the culture. I know the culture, I am from the same culture. If Yao grew up in the States, this would be a totally different Yao, he would be dominating by now as opposed to playing passive aggressively.


You should have watched Yao during the Athens games. He was pretty passionate and also pretty vocal. Do you remember when he called out his teammates? Like I said in a previous post, Yao has the ability to lead.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 8:34 am
User avatarPosts: 93Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 9:00 am
neodurdin wrote:
I blame the culture.


Chinese culture has produced a lot of great leaders. All you have to do is open a history book and find out.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 9:10 am
User avatarPosts: 948Location: Washington, DCJoined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:52 pm
well... those leader never led foreigners, did they?

stormysnakes wrote:
neodurdin wrote:
I blame the culture.


Chinese culture has produced a lot of great leaders. All you have to do is open a history book and find out.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 9:58 am
User avatarPosts: 644Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 9:46 pm
I didn't say you produce great leaders because of the culture. Different areas of life requires different methods. But for basketball, for anything remotely physically and or mentally competitive, where you play to win. Western approaches of individualism, that way of thinking tends to produce more aggressive leaders, it's in the culture. Everything in a capitalist market, you have to compete for and set yourself apart. In communist countries where most things are handed to you, you don't have that mentality. I am not passing judgment as to which is better, only that in a Westernized individualized culture, more competitive players with a certain mentality are produced. If Yao had grown up in the USA, I'm sure he wouldn't be so nice on the court. Being nice in a competitive sport is a handicap. Right now Yao has that handicap and it remains to be seen whether he can get over it. Yes, I did see the Athens games, I watched every game in detail. Yes, he did lose it on his team mates. However, he's too timid to say anything to his NBA teammates, there is a big BIG difference between calling out your Chinese National team than to call out NBA players who will GET in your face, GIVE you ******, swear at you, challenge you or god forbid fight you. Yao knows that will not happen with his Chinese teammates, because SADLY, they are JUST like him. So don't give me this whole he was aggressive crap because he was pissed of at the Chinese National Team, it means nothing. Until the day Yao can call out his Houston teammates, he can NEVER NEVER EVER EVER be a leader on that team.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 10:14 am
User avatarPosts: 93Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 9:00 am
ZingyDNA wrote:
well... those leader never led foreigners, did they?


I don't know, but my former Chinese boss, who was born and raised outside the US and didn't speak good English, didn't have any problem "leading" his non-Chinese workers.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 11:24 am
User avatarPosts: 93Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 9:00 am
neodurdin wrote:
I didn't say you produce great leaders because of the culture. Different areas of life requires different methods. But for basketball, for anything remotely physically and or mentally competitive, where you play to win. Western approaches of individualism, that way of thinking tends to produce more aggressive leaders, it's in the culture. Everything in a capitalist market, you have to compete for and set yourself apart. In communist countries where most things are handed to you, you don't have that mentality. I am not passing judgment as to which is better, only that in a Westernized individualized culture, more competitive players with a certain mentality are produced. If Yao had grown up in the USA, I'm sure he wouldn't be so nice on the court. Being nice in a competitive sport is a handicap. Right now Yao has that handicap and it remains to be seen whether he can get over it. Yes, I did see the Athens games, I watched every game in detail. Yes, he did lose it on his team mates. However, he's too timid to say anything to his NBA teammates, there is a big BIG difference between calling out your Chinese National team than to call out NBA players who will GET in your face, GIVE you ******, swear at you, challenge you or god forbid fight you. Yao knows that will not happen with his Chinese teammates, because SADLY, they are JUST like him. So don't give me this whole he was aggressive crap because he was pissed of at the Chinese National Team, it means nothing. Until the day Yao can call out his Houston teammates, he can NEVER NEVER EVER EVER be a leader on that team.


I think it's a combination of a seniority issue and cross cultural issue. Take Vlade Divac for example. He came from a communist system. I don't remember him leading his team very much during his early years. But when he was with Sacramento, he led the team. By then he was older and wiser in terms of basketball. But when he left, Chris Webber asserted himself as the leader. You didn't see Peja doing this. But let's say, "What if the Sacramento Kings was a Serbian team in Serbia with mainly Serbian players?" Who would assert himself as the leader? Peja or Webber? You can see this during international competitions like the Olympics. Pau Gausol, Manu Ginobili, Dirk Nowitzki, etc asserted themselves as the leaders in their national teams. But here in the NBA, you really don't see them as the leader of their respective team. Anyway, I think you have to have seniority and/or be the dominant culture on the team to assert your authority. (I think it also really helps if you feel that everybody else is equal or inferior to you.) Like I said before, Yao has leadership abilities.

------------------------
The following excerpt is from an article that best illustrates Yao's leadership ability.

http://www.nba.com/rockets/news/yao_dream_040824.html

ROCKETS.COM: Through your work with the Chinese National Team as a whole, you got to see how Yao interacts with his teammates. What kind of a role does Yao take on with the Chinese National Team?

FALSONE: He was a great example for them. Yao is a totally different personality over there than he is here as far as a teammate goes. He


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 12:40 pm
Posts: 107Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2003 4:55 am
bblock12000 wrote:
you're out of touch w the nuances of NBA Basketball. get real :!:

Yao is an NBA all-Star, w limitless potential.

but, Duncan, at this time, is better than Yao. and Duncan is not even dominant, on the same level as Shaq

Yao is excellent; needs power moves to complement his finesse game. absent those power moves, he can never be dominant.

to disminish Shaq's game as merely effective, but when in fact, he is dominant---and annointing Yao as being dominating when his has been effective---is stupid.
you need to come to grips w reality:
    :arrow: the earth is round and
    :arrow: wZZ sux, thus far, in the NBA
    :arrow: Yao needs to step up to the next level toward dominance in the NBA; not there yet

I agree that Yao is not there yet.
Every word you say is right. We hope he will be dominant sooner.


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