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<  Yao on the court, and his most recent game  ~  Yang Lan's One-On-One With Yao Ming (2 Episodes)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:26 pm
User avatarPosts: 12417Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:27 pm
Yaorule, the more you contradict urself, the more stupid you come across.
    thank you
    for making it so easy for me to point out your stupidity :!:
    pryuen wrote:
  • Yao Ming said he sometimes compared the difficulties he encountered in running/managing the team
      to the difficulties that Deng Xiaoping encountered when he advocated the open door economic reform policy for China back in 1978. :shock: :shock:

  • pryuen wrote:
    Yao Ming said it VERY EXPLICITLY to Yang Lan that he made that comparison cos by doing so :roll: :roll: , ....
    pryuen wrote:
    Yeah, Yao Ming made that comaprison, SO WHAT ? :?:

pryuen wrote:
Big Yao was not :oops: :oops: :roll: :roll: :D :D trying to compare .... ...


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 8:32 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
Dr. No wrote:
Yaorule, the more you contradict urself, the more stupid you come across. [list] thank you
for making it so easy for me to point out your stupidity :!:


Dr. No wrote:

what DXP did was monumental, of historical proportion. DXP's actions had ( still have and will continue to do so for decades to come ) national and global impacts. It was a trandscending event, with far-reaching consequences, in history.



You're just a stubborn @$$. :roll:

Look at what you posted.....

You are MISINTEPRETING what Yao Ming's comparison FROM THE VERY START.

EVERONE
knew what DXP did was monumental and of historical proportion.

He is
NOT saying the revolutionary changes that he is going to bring to Chinese basketball systems is going to be of the SAME SIGNIFICANCE as DXP's open door economic reform.

He was saying the
DIFFICULTIES, OPPOSITIONS, HURDLES, CRITICISMS that DXP faced in advocating/implementing the open door economic reform policy is of SUCH MAGNITUDE/ENORMITY that the DIFFICULTIES, OPPOSITIONS, HURDLES, CRITICISMS that he faced/will face in trying to bring about revolutionary changes to Chinese basketball systems in running/managing his Shanghai franchise is going to be INSIGNIFCANT AND NOT WORTH MENTIONING, and by doing such comparison, it will make him feel MORE COMFORTABLE AND PSYCHOLOGICALLY BALANCED.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 11:00 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
EPISODE 2 of Yang Lan's one-on-one with Yao Ming.

http://player.youku.com/player.php/sid/37330182/v.swf


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 1:12 pm
Posts: 10073Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2004 7:10 pm
Dr. No wrote:
Yaorule, the more you contradict urself, the more stupid you come across.
    thank you
    for making it so easy for me to point out your stupidity :!:
    pryuen wrote:
  • Yao Ming said he sometimes compared the difficulties he encountered in running/managing the team
      to the difficulties that Deng Xiaoping encountered when he advocated the open door economic reform policy for China back in 1978. :shock: :shock:

  • pryuen wrote:
    Yao Ming said it VERY EXPLICITLY to Yang Lan that he made that comparison cos by doing so :roll: :roll: , ....
    pryuen wrote:
    Yeah, Yao Ming made that comaprison, SO WHAT ? :?:

pryuen wrote:
Big Yao was not :oops: :oops: :roll: :roll: :D :D trying to compare .... ...


you really do have a problem with the concept of allegory dont you? no one is literally saying Yao and Deng are alike. Deng and the market reforms are a SYMBOL of what Yao thinks must be done in his case. what Yao is saying simply is that Chinese basketball is in the stone age compared to its Western counterpart, like China's economy was in the 1970s compared to the West.

and he's saying, in order to modernize and become competitive and profitable, that Yao wants to provide the EXAMPLE and guidance like Deng did. he wont be managing the day to day just like Deng didn't go out and start millions of businesses, but he did form the philosophical and bureaucratic guidelines under which other men could bring the economy forward. it's a very simple point of allusion, and you just proved that you're a dumbass arguing 3 pages because you cant comprehend a simple comparison that 10 year old could logically process.

Quote:
ticket sales were stagnant, even with the ticket price lowered from RMB 80 to RMB 2


this is the part that surprised me. that basically means that even if the ticket is pretty much FREE ppl dont want to see Yao's team. crazy


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:35 pm
User avatarPosts: 12417Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:27 pm
temuchin wrote:
what Yao is saying simply .....
and he's saying, .....,
...stupidity is pretending to be Yao's spokesman.

At least PRY quotes Yao.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:47 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
Dr. No wrote:
temuchin wrote:
what Yao is saying simply .....
and he's saying, .....,
...stupidity is pretending to be Yao's spokesman.

At least PRY quotes Yao.


So which part of Yao Ming's following quote you don't understand??? :roll:

Yao Ming wrote:


我这么鼓励自己,回想1978年我们伟大的设计师邓小平面临的改革压力有多大,现在看上海男篮的改革,只能说是小菜一碟

This is how I motivate myself. On restropect of how enormous the pressure our great designer Deng Xiaoping was facing during his (open door economic) reform back in 1978, the reform (and the pressure) that I'm facing now in the reform of the Shanghai team is just a piece of cake.



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:34 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
temuchin wrote:


you really do have a problem with the concept of allegory dont you? no one is literally saying Yao and Deng are alike. Deng and the market reforms are a SYMBOL of what Yao thinks must be done in his case. what Yao is saying simply is that Chinese basketball is in the stone age compared to its Western counterpart, like China's economy was in the 1970s compared to the West.

and he's saying, in order to modernize and become competitive and profitable, that Yao wants to provide the EXAMPLE and guidance like Deng did. he wont be managing the day to day just like Deng didn't go out and start millions of businesses, but he did form the philosophical and bureaucratic guidelines under which other men could bring the economy forward. it's a very simple point of allusion, and you just proved that you're a dumbass arguing 3 pages because you cant comprehend a simple comparison that 10 year old could logically process.




Well, Yao Ming was NOT EVEN saying that.

He was not trying to compare the IMPACT/ACHIEVEMENT of DXP's open door reform to what he currently wants to achieve through acquiring/managing Shanghai Sharks to Chinese basketball systems.

What Yao Ming was saying is that
relative to the enormous difficulties, opposition, hurdles, challenges, pressure, setbacks, frustration that Deng Xiaoping faced in his advocation/implementation of the open door economic reforms, the difficulties, oppositions, hurdles, challenges, pressure, setbacks, frustration that he encountered now or will face in future (players turmoil/strikes, Liu Wei's incident, asking his mentor Li Qiuping to step down as head coach etc. etc. etc.) is just a piece of cake.

BUT YOU'RE DARN RIGHT. I just CAN'T UNDERSTAND WHY such simple logic/allusion/analogy could not be grasped by our Dr. Knows All......


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 6:34 am
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
pryuen wrote:
EPISODE 2 of Yang Lan's one-on-one with Yao Ming.

http://player.youku.com/player.php/sid/37330182/v.swf


I was planning to do a summary of the above Episode 2 of Yang Lan One-On-One with Yao Ming that was aired on last Saturday (January 30).

But I found an article on Yang Lan's personal blog on sina.com that I think nicely summarized what she did with Yao Ming on this episode (and the previous episode as well).


So here it goes......


ENJOY !!!! :P :P 8)

[quote]

http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_47761464 ... .html?tj=1

[size=109]In the past 8 years, I have been fortunate to be able to interview Yao Ming for 3 times; the first time was back in 2002 when he had just been successfully drafted by NBA; he was about to leave China; he was feeling very uneasy, unsure about his future; (he said) he even had the impulse to turn back once leaving the customs. At that time, he had no clues about NBA; he did not understand the United States; and he had no idea of what lied in the future waiting for him.

The second interview was conducted right after the 2008 Beijing Olympics; at that time, he led the China national team and gave his/their all in the Olympics, and his efforts were recognized and well appreciated by the Chinese people, particularly during competition with countries like Lithuania, Spain. The war-cry slogan he proposed (to his team mates) was


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 8:28 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
Here is the English version that Yang Lan wrote for China Daily.

And............

It's going to be a girl !!!! :shock: :shock: :shock:


Quote:

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/life/2010- ... 426783.htm

Yao head and shoulders above the rest

By Yang Lan (China Daily)

Over the past eight years, I have had the pleasure of interviewing basketball star Yao Ming three times. I first sat down with him in 2002, just before he was scheduled to leave for the United States to play in the NBA. Although he had been the first round draft pick that year, he still felt a sense of ambivalence about how his new life in the US would turn out.

The second time I interviewed him was during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He had returned as a hero, but knew he and his teammates needed to step up if the nation was to get a medal in the competition.

The last time we met, Yao was unable to walk without crutches.

I have watched the wide arc of Yao's career and wondered what it means for the development of Chinese basketball. It boils down to these five major points.

Firstly, Yao's physical growth. Back in 2002 Yao was a shy, lanky 22 year old. Over the years his body has filled out to match his position as center. Now that he is out of action, it is even bigger.

Second, is Yao's transformation from first round draft pick to team owner of the Shanghai Sharks, where he started his career.

Third, as a young player he earned little, now he earns over $52 million a year. He knows that all too often his fellow NBA players go broke just 3.5 years after retiring. Yao told me these young players suddenly start to earn enormous salaries, but have no training in how to manage their fortunes. I asked him what he had done to avoid such a situation.

"When I first started out I was only earning about 10 yuan ($1.46) a week, with an occasional 700 yuan bonus for winning a game I quickly spent that whole bonus."

But Yao's parents taught him how to save his money, in the traditional Chinese way. They insisted he put his earnings in the bank, and to use his savings cautiously. He followed his parents' advice closely until last year when he decided to spend big and invest in the Shanghai Sharks.

Fourth, is the emotional journey Yao has experienced, from being a struggling basketball player to being an icon and father of a baby girl, in a few months' time.

Thirty years ago journalists predicted the day when the son of two local basketball stars would become the bright hope of Shanghai basketball. Today, the media is pinning the same hopes on the daughter of Yao and his wife, also a former basketball player.

Yao told me about his excitement of becoming a father; especially when he first heard his daughter's heartbeat on the monitor.

This is a much-needed positive experience for Yao, who has been battling injuries for the past two years.

This endless surgery is taking its toll on Yao. He even thought about giving it all up and retiring, so he asked his doctor if he did not have surgery would he be able to play basketball with his child? The doctor answered, he would not even be able to walk. Hence he decided to go forward with surgery.

Finally, there is the evolution of Yao's mind. He has become a wise man who has devoted time and money into life after the NBA.

But the current CBA system is not so profitable. About 40 percent of the team's revenue comes from sales of broadcasting rights, but it still only barely covers the operating costs. The rest comes from ticket sales, a maximum of 4 million yuan, when operating costs are about 27 million. Sales of merchandise and sponsorship makes up the deficit.

Yao said he does not see his investment in purely financial terms, but also as a way to support the development of basketball in China and return the favor to Shanghai for looking after him in his early days.

A few days before our most recent interview, Yao was asked to attend an awards ceremony for top athletes in China. He realized his superstar friends and fellow athletes were often forced to take low-paying jobs because they had little formal education.

As boss of the Shanghai Sharks, Yao has invited both teachers and mentors to help his players better manage their financial futures.

Another of Yao's problems has been balancing the knowledge he has gained in the NBA with the traditions of home.

As head of the Sharks he has to consider what's best for his team, even if it means hurting some of his closest friends. Like his first coach, Li Qiuping, who was in hospital when Yao told him he was going to have to replace him with an American coach. As for friend Liu Wei, he got his agent to discuss a new contract, rather than settle the matter over a private dinner, as is the Chinese way.

Navigating traditional Chinese society, he said, can be tricky at times. He sometimes wistfully thinks back to his early days, when he just played basketball. Even so, he never shies away from the challenge.

When I think about these five aspects of Yao's life, I admire him as an example of someone who is down-to-earth and has not let fame go to his head.

As Yao enters a new phase in his life, his 30's, fatherhood, returning to the NBA, and the next step in his career as manager, he shows the courage to make a difference in the world.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:55 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
For some strange reasons, that video of the Episode 2 of Yang Lan One-on-One with Yao Ming on Youku.com that I posted above had been removed.

So for those of you that missed watching the interview, here is another site that you could see the interview.

http://www.openv.com/play/SHDongFangTVp ... 887_0.html


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