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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 6:19 am
Posts: 1489Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:21 am
I figured Chinese soccer/football was pretty much a lost cause in sports.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 6:30 am
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
superjohn wrote:


You moron, how come Australia soccer ranks in the 20s in he world while China is about 80s? China should rank at least higher than Japan and Korea. Another question is that South Africa also ranks in the 80s and they are hosting the world cup. Maybe China should try to host the world cup.


Yeah in our dreams............ :roll:

Maybe we have to wait 20 years......


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:02 am
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
karamazov wrote:

I just don't get it, why China can not be better at these games. - I will not buy that its because Asians are somehow genetically inferior in sports.


Well, the CROOKED SYSTEMS is one thing.

The other issues that had been pulling the hind legs of basketball and soccer in China are RULES/REGULATIONS AND PEOPLE.

There are just too many power struggles within the hierarchy.

I'll give you a few examples:


  • The current head coach of Chinese soccer team is Gao Hongbo. When he was still a player, he was one of the most profilic scorers of China, at the tender age of 17 to 18. But he was never selected into the national team during his prime, cos the head coach of the national team at that time had personal grudges with Gao Hongbo's mentor. He was only selected into the national team at the age of 27 to 28, i.e. at the twilight of his career, when this particular national head coach stepped down.
  • There is this player, Li Weifeng, currently playing in the professional league in South Korea. He used to be the captain of the national team, and one of the best central defenders in China and even in Asia (He was the sole nominee from South Korea by Asian Football Confederation for 2009 Asia Footballer of the Year); but he had too many enemies within the China Football Association, that he was not considered for selection for the national team for the past 5 years.....
  • And in China, both in basketball and soccer, most of the players are bound by long term contracts with the clubs; there is no proper rules for transfers or trades. If a team owner does not like a player, that player could sit and rot on the bench in that team, without given a chance for play. Can you imagine Hao Lin (the starting centre) and Du Wei (the team captain) of the current China national team were sitting and rotting on the bench of Shanghai Shenhua, cos they caused the wrath of Shanghai Shenhua's team opwner??
IT'S TOO COMPLICATED !!!


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:44 pm
User avatarPosts: 12438Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:27 pm
Momak wrote:
I figured Chinese soccer/football was pretty much a lost cause in sports.
facts bear you out.

it has been a lost cause.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 6:50 am
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am
Dr. No wrote:
Momak wrote:
I figured Chinese soccer/football was pretty much a lost cause in sports.
facts bear you out.

it has been a lost cause.


At least the soccer fans in China had something worthwhile to celebrate for yesterday!!

Beijing GuoAn beat Japan's Kawasaki Frontale 3 ~ 1 in an important away game in their Group E soccer match of the AFC Champions League at Todoroki Stadium in Kawasaki near Tokyo, Japan.

And Changchun Yatai thrashed Persipura Jayapura, the Indonesian champion, 9 ~ 0 in another AFC Champions League game in Changchun.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:18 pm
Posts: 890Location: Pasadena, USAJoined: Mon Feb 24, 2003 6:54 pm
yeah Chinese club soccer does marginally better than the national team.
although i must say often I see foreign players scoring goals for them rather than home grown guys.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:40 pm
User avatarPosts: 59329Location: Hong Kong/ChinaJoined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 5:13 am


Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks matched the red hot combination of Andre Emmett and Stromile Swift tonight to beat Shandong Kingston Lions 118 ~ 103 and locked their position #4 in the CBA league ranking.

The game was a closely contested one with Shandong Kingston Lions leading in 1Q (31 ~ 27) and half time (57 ~ 52).

When everyone worried about Shanghai Sharks in the 3Q, cos they could only use 1 expat players versus 2 expat players from Shandong, surprisingly they came back to lead 75 ~ 72 by end of 3Q.

When both team were playing with full squad in 4Q, relying on some home cooking/bad officiating, Shandong came from behind to lead Shanghai by 9 points (86 ~ 77) at the 6 minutes mark. But then relying on some tight defense, and some sharp shooting, John Lucas III hit 3 consecutive 3-pointers to tie the game, and then Shanghai had another 9 ~ 0 run, and never looked back to win the game 118 ~ 103.

John Lucas III was the top scorer with 34 points (13/27 FG% 7/13 3-pointer% 1/1 FT%)/8 rebounds/5 assists; Liu Wei returned from injury to contribute 30 points (12/21 FG% 4/6 3-pointer% 2/2 FT%)/7 rebounds/5 assists; Garret Siler: 17 points (7/9 FG% 3/6 FT%)/6 rebounds/4 block shots; Zaid Abbas: 17 points (8/12 FG% 1/3 FT%)/13 rebounds/1 assist/1 block shot.

On Shandong side, Andre Emmett was contained to only 4 points by half time, but he finally found his rhythm in 3Q and 4Q to come up with 30 points (11/26 FG% 1/9 3-pointer% 7/8 FT%)/11 rebounds/1 assist/1 block shot; Stromile Swift: 25 points (10/18 FG% 5/8 FT%)/11 rebounds/4 block shots; Sun Jie: 21 points (8/13 FG% 5/7 3-pointer%)/3 rebounds/1 assist.


So Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks improved to 24W 6L; With 2 games remaining in the regular season where they have to play against the 2 Guangdong teams (Dongguan New Century Leopards and Guangdong Hongyuan Dongguan Bank), the likehood for them to surpass Zhejiang Guangsha for the #3 spot is slim even though Zhejiang Guangsha surprisingly lost to Liaoning Panpan Hunters to be even with Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks with the same win/loss ratio of 24W 6L, but still Zhejiang Guangsha owned the tiebreaker over Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks if they finish the regular season with the same win/loss ratio.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 8:38 pm
User avatarPosts: 4524Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:00 pm
pryuen wrote:


Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks matched the red hot combination of Andre Emmett and Stromile Swift tonight to beat Shandong Kingston Lions 118 ~ 103 and locked their position #4 in the CBA league ranking.

The game was a closely contested one with Shandong Kingston Lions leading in 1Q (31 ~ 27) and half time (57 ~ 52).

When everyone worried about Shanghai Sharks in the 3Q, cos they could only use 1 expat players versus 2 expat players from Shandong, surprisingly they came back to lead 75 ~ 72 by end of 3Q.

When both team were playing with full squad in 4Q, relying on some home cooking/bad officiating, Shandong came from behind to lead Shanghai by 9 points (86 ~ 77) at the 6 minutes mark. But then relying on some tight defense, and some sharp shooting, John Lucas III hit 3 consecutive 3-pointers to tie the game, and then Shanghai had another 9 ~ 0 run, and never looked back to win the game 118 ~ 103.

John Lucas III was the top scorer with 34 points (13/27 FG% 7/13 3-pointer% 1/1 FT%)/8 rebounds/5 assists; Liu Wei returned from injury to contribute 30 points (12/21 FG% 4/6 3-pointer% 2/2 FT%)/7 rebounds/5 assists; Garret Siler: 17 points (7/9 FG% 3/6 FT%)/6 rebounds/4 block shots; Zaid Abbas: 17 points (8/12 FG% 1/3 FT%)/13 rebounds/1 assist/1 block shot.

On Shandong side, Andre Emmett was contained to only 4 points by half time, but he finally found his rhythm in 3Q and 4Q to come up with 30 points (11/26 FG% 1/9 3-pointer% 7/8 FT%)/11 rebounds/1 assist/1 block shot; Stromile Swift: 25 points (10/18 FG% 5/8 FT%)/11 rebounds/4 block shots; Sun Jie: 21 points (8/13 FG% 5/7 3-pointer%)/3 rebounds/1 assist.


So Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks improved to 24W 6L; With 2 games remaining in the regular season where they have to play against the 2 Guangdong teams (Dongguan New Century Leopards and Guangdong Hongyuan Dongguan Bank), the likehood for them to surpass Zhejiang Guangsha for the #3 spot is slim even though Zhejiang Guangsha surprisingly lost to Liaoning Panpan Hunters to be even with Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks with the same win/loss ratio of 24W 6L, but still Zhejiang Guangsha owned the tiebreaker over Shanghai MAXXIS Sharks if they finish the regular season with the same win/loss ratio.


Can Yao watch his team while he's in Houston. either through satellite or on the internet? What if his team makes it to the CBA finals and plays against GD southern tigers, will Yao go back to watch his team And will he follow his team during road games?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 10:16 pm
Posts: 18023Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 1:31 pm
karamazov wrote:
yeah Chinese club soccer does marginally better than the national team.
although i must say often I see foreign players scoring goals for them rather than home grown guys.

That's not true anymore.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 11, 2010 1:39 pm
User avatarPosts: 7735Joined: Fri May 18, 2007 10:06 pm
pryuen wrote:

Well, NOT NECESSARILY SO.

Yao Ming used to be trained as a goalie for water polo; then switched to backetball;

Su Wei, centre for Guangdong Hongyuan Dongguan Bank, was sent at a very young age to be trained as a rower; but he changed to basketball when he was 14 years old.

Song Kangming, centre of Dongguan New Century Leopards was trained for 4 to 5 years in its Yantai Sports Academy as a discus thrower.


WHAT made you think Liu Xiang was an exception?? He entered the Shanghai Sports Academy at the age of 12, and was trained as a high jumper for 3 years, before he switched to focus on 110 meter hurdle.


Out of so many athletes you have managed to pick out a few. You probably know the Chinese sports system better than I do but I still think overall the system of selecting kids at a very young age and try to develop them in a sport doesn't necessarily guarantee you'll get the right kids into the right sports. It's a bit hit and missed. Even if they do get to change at a later date, some of the athletes you've mentioned do so when they are already into their teens. Now there has been NBA players who have succeeded when picking up the game in their teens like Hakeem and Dennis Rodman but it's rare. Picking up a new sports in your mid-teens means you missed out on the little intricate details of the game.

With Liu Xiang, he switched to the high hurdles because he like the sport and decided to choose it as his profession. The sports official never choose the 110 m hurdle for him. That's the difference between Liu Xiang and other Chinese athletes. Do you think he would have been as success as a high jumper? Most likely not but he has become one of the all time great hurdlers because HE CHOSE to do it.


Last edited by Tang Man on Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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